Images

Entanglement or quantum interference? – that is the question about the foundation of quantum reality! (Source: IFJ PAN)

Will bitcoin topple the dollar of its pedestal? (Source: IFJ PAN)

The CREDO Detector begins to collect scientific data. Users can see their contribution (green color) to the results of the current experiment (red color). (Source: CREDO Collaboration)

The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory on the slope of the Mexican Sierra Negra volcano. (Source: HAWC Observatory, J. Goodman)

Sources of very high-energy gamma radiation around the microquasar SS 433 surrounded by the W50 nebula. (Source: HAWC Observatory)

Will anomalies observed in the decays of beauty mesons disappear with the new data, as exotic lands disappeared from maps of cartographers? The latest analysis, taking into account long-range interactions, proves that the anomalies are visible not less, but better. (Source: IFJ PAN)

Remote synchronization in a network of simple electronic oscillators connected in a ring. Periodic fluctuation of the low frequency component driving the effect, resembling a diffraction pattern, is represented by the colors of the oscillators. (Source: IFJ PAN)

Baryons containing a charm quark can decay at once into a proton and two muons. Using data from the LHCb experiment, scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow have shown that in these extremely rare processes there are still no signs of the 'new physics'. The signal of the nonresonant decay is visible at the top, the signal of the resonant decay into a proton and omega meson is presented below. (Source: IFJ PAN, CERN, The LHCb Collaboration)

Ultrarelativistic flow of quark-gluon plasma with spin. On the left, the initial state of the system, on the right – the result of hydrodynamic evolution. The arrows on the bottom view show the plasma flow lines. The red area is the region of polarized particles that evolves according to the flow of matter. The top graphs show plasma temperature profiles. (Source: IFJ PAN)

The ultrarelativistic collision of a clustered beryllium nucleus 7Be with a heavy lead nucleus 208Pb creates a fireball of quark-gluon plasma. The initial shape of the fireball and its expansion rates in various directions carry information about the original structure of the beryllium nucleus. (Source: IFJ PAN)

CREDO Detector transforms your smartphone into an important element of the largest particle detector in history. (Source: IFJ PAN)

Tracks of particles detected by the CREDO Detector app. (Source: IFJ PAN / CREDO / user smph-kitkat)

Comparison of mechanisms of favored and unfavored fragmentation of quarks. (Source: IFJ PAN)

Particles produced during one of the collisions of two protons, each with energies of 7 TeV, registered by the detectors of the LHCb experiment in 2011; view from two different sides. (Source: CERN, LHCb)

The distribution of dark matter (colored in blue) in six galaxy clusters, mapped from the visible-light images from the Hubble Space Telescope. (Source: NASA, ESA, STScI, and CXC)

Graphs showing scientific connections initiated by Paul Erdos, Edward Witten, Marcel Ausloos and H. Eugene Stanley. In the case of Edward Witten there are three clearly visible sub-networks, corresponding to specific topics. (Source: IFJ PAN)

Graphs showing scientific connections initiated by Paul Erdos, Edward Witten, Marcel Ausloos and H. Eugene Stanley. In the case of Edward Witten there are three clearly visible sub-networks, corresponding to specific topics. (Source: IFJ PAN)

Graph showing the flow of ideas initiated by Prof. H. Eugene Stanley. Connections between collaborators show the existence of several clearly visible sub-networks, corresponding to scientific communities focusing on specific research topics. (Source: IFJ PAN)

For 80 million working hours, the GAMBIT Collaboration tracked possible clues of ‘new physics’ with the Cracow supercomputer Prometheus, confronting the predictions of several models of supersymmetry with data collected by the most sophisticated contemporary scientific experiments. (Source: KSAF, Maciej Bernas)

For 80 million working hours, the GAMBIT Collaboration tracked possible clues of ‘new physics’ with the Cracow supercomputer Prometheus, confronting the predictions of several models of supersymmetry with data collected by the most sophisticated contemporary scientific experiments. (Source: Cyfronet, AGH)

In cosmic rays there are more high-energy positrons than could be produced by pulsars in our vicinity: Geminga and PSR B0656+14. (Source: John Pretz)

The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory (HAWC) detector, Sierra Negra, Mexico. (Source: Jordan A. Goodman)

Quark-gluon plasma in the LHC is produced as a result of collisions of lead nuclei (in white) approaching along one direction at velocities close to the speed of light. The fluid formed by quarks and gluons (in red, green and blue) initially moves along the direction of the beam. Anisotropic hydrodynamics, presented by researchers from the Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow, Poland, is currently the most accurate description of the phenomena occurring in quark-gluon plasma. (Source: CERN/Henning Weber)

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Chaotic voltage changes are common even for electronic circuits made up of only several elements. In the top left corner is a diagram of the simplest chaotic oscillator found by physicists from IFJ PAN in Cracow. On the right, a series of pulses showing a great resemblance to neural activity, generated by one of the newly discovered circuits. In the lower row several so-called attractors, illustrating the complexity of behaviour of the new circuits. (Source: IFJ PAN)

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Many simple electronic systems can behave in a difficult to foresee, chaotic manner, as shown by researchers from the Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences in Cracow. The image shows a device built from two recently discovered oscillators. In the background are so-called attractors, illustrating the diversity and richness of behaviour of the new circuits. (Source: IFJ PAN)

An artist’s rendering of a cosmic-ray air shower with a water-Cherenkov detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory in western Argentina (A. Chantelauze, S. Staffi, L. Bret)

One hemisphere of the Gammasphere, the most advanced instrument for detecting gamma rays. (Source: Roy Kaltschmidt, Lawrence Berkeley Lab photographer)

Lithium amide-borohydride is a promising candidate for a solid electrolyte. The crystalline structure of this material consists of two sub-lattices, shown in different colors. Under appropriate conditions, lithium ions (red), normally found in the elementary cells of only one sub-lattice (yellow), move to the empty cells of the second sub-lattice (blue) where they can freely propagate. (Source: IFJ PAN)

In an experiment performed at the Romanian accelerator centre IFIN-HH, an international team of physicists observed a ‘second face’ of the nickel-66 nuclei: a relatively stable excited state in which the shape of nucleus is changed. (Source: IFIN-HH)

Inflatons, hypothetical particles beyond the Standard Model, were sought in mesons decays observed by the LHCb experiment at CERN. The image shows a typical, fully reconstructed LHCb event. (Source: LHCb Collaboration, CERN)

Fragments of extremely hot matter, produced in the collision of heavy atomic nuclei at the SPS accelerator at the European CERN centre, move away from each other at high velocities, forming streaks along the direction of the collision. (Source: IFJ PAN, Iwona Sputowska)

Extremely rare Bs0 meson decay into two muons, registered in 2016 at the LHCb detector at CERN near Geneva. The enlargement at the bottom shows that the point of decay was 17 mm from the collision of two protons. (Source: IFJ PAN / CERN / The LHCb Collaboration)

Microscopic images of the europium silicide nanoislands on the silicon surface. The nanoislands are completely isolated (left) or adjoining each other (right). (Source: IFJ PAN)

A structure of europium silicide nanoislands.
(Source: IFJ PAN)

The first trace of differences between matter and "common", baryonic antimatter has just been encountered in decays of the beauty baryon Lambda b. Pictured above: LHCb Collaboration in front of LHCb detector. (Source: CERN, The LHCb Collaboration)

Like a surfer on a wave, a proton can be coupled with the vibrations of an atomic nucleus. Pictured in the role of proton is a bubble of air graphically pulled out from under the surface. (Source: IFJ PAN, jch)

Recent research conducted at the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Polish Academy of Sciences in Kraków reveals that in narrative texts punctuation plays as important role as words. (Source: IFJ PAN)

Probability of occurrence of words (vertical axis) versus their rank (horizontal axis) for corpora representing different European languages. The original puzzling downward departure from the straight line for ranks close to unity, observed for the ordinary words (brighter colors), disappears (corresponding darker colors) when the punctuation marks are also taken into account. (Source: IFJ PAN)

Atomic nuclei do not in any case look like a perfect sphere (top). With a larger number of protons and neutrons the nuclei can be flattened or extended along one, two or three axes. The latter case (bottom right) is known as superdeformed triaxial. (Source: IFJ PAN)

Atomic nuclei do not in any case look like a perfect sphere (top). With a larger number of protons and neutrons the nuclei can be flattened or extended along one, two or three axes. The latter case (bottom right) is known as superdeformed triaxial. (Source: IFJ PAN)

Production of mesons and antimesons D0 in interactions between gluons g. Left: creation of a single pair, right: two pairs are born.
(Source: IFJ PAN)

Ultra-peripheral collisions of lead nuclei at the LHC accelerator can lead to elastic collisions of photons with photons.
(Source: IFJ PAN)

Liquid-crystal SMEs have a different structure than previously expected (Source: IFJ PAN)

The HAWC gamma ray observatory

A view of 2/3 of the entire sky with very-high-energy gamma rays observed by HAWC

A zoom into a region in the Milky Way

Computer simulation of rare decay of Bs meson to J/psi and phi mesons in LHCb detector at CERN. (Source: CERN)

Multifractality in literature (Source: IFJ PAN)

Multifractal analysis of Finnegan’s Wake by James Joyce (Source: IFJ PAN)

Sequences of sentence lengths (as measured by number of words) in four literary works representative of various degrees of cascading character. (Source: IFJ PAN)

A new form of iron oxide (Source: IFJ PAN)

Growth of the areas of crystallization and their numerical analysis (Source: IFJ PAN)

Examples of analysis of multifractals (Source: IFJ PAN, NASA/GSFC/SDO)

Solar eclipse, 23 October 2014 (Source: Tom Ruen)

Graphs on multifractal analysis of the variability of sunspots show a clear right-handed asymmetry (Source: IFJ PAN, NASA/GSFC/SDO)

Schematic diagram of the ATLAS Detector (CERN)

Inside view of the ATLAS Detector at the LHC accelerator at CERN near Geneva (CERN)

Narrow particle streams (jets) recorded by the ATLAS Dectector in a single collision of lead nuclei (CERN)

The MATROSHKA phantom covered by a container imitation the shielding properties of a spacesuit (DLR)

The MATROSHKA phantom on board of the International Space Station (NASA)

Interior structure of the phantom used in the experiment MATROSHKA (DLR)

Birds eye view of future ESS site

AGATA spectrometer

Two models of the carbon 12C nucleus